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Michelle Majors, MATL '11

  • INSPIRING TEEN GIRLS TO BECOME LEADERS

    Michelle Majors likes to help women create new possibilities for themselves. She sees herself bridging the gap between trailblazers and everyday women, transforming the world through entrepreneurship and leadership.

    Majors runs an image and personal development firm, Strut, Inc., that offers everything from style and life coaching to navigating and recovering from relationship break-ups. She’s also founder and CEO of wakeUPgirl, a multimedia website that features an online magazine, a radio broadcast and clips from various television news programs and shows.

    After a nasty break-up with a former NFL football player, she self-published her insights about empowerment in the book From Break-up to Wake Up: A Woman’s Guide to Finding Herself After Losing Love! Her book dissects a relationship break-up into three phases—disorientation, reorientation and launch. Stop pressing that snooze button on life, she urges readers, and create a new destiny.

    A native of Seattle and graduate of Franklin High School, Majors first considered Seattle University for dual graduate degrees in law and transformational leadership. She soon realized a transformational leadership degree from the School of Theology and Ministry was the best fit for her. It was the spiritual component of how to serve the greater good and humanity that appealed to her most.

    “I realized I love the social justice mission of the Jesuits,” she says of SU’s faith-based mission.

    What she didn’t know is how much SU would help her retool her future goals. Today she focuses on how to develop self-confidence in teen girls.

    “I wanted to know why, when sitting in a classroom, some girls are able to raise their hands and others aren’t. What gives some girls the confidence to do that? I discovered these girls have mothers who value education and encourage their daughters.”

    “For those girls who don’t raise their hands, we need to supplement what they aren’t getting,” she continues. “So many girls have a light in them and nobody sees it. I want to help them find their power and tap into that light.”

    Majors recalls her own childhood and says she was a good kid who tried to hide the personal trials and dysfunction in her life. It was her teachers and a principal who saw a light in her and fostered her self-confidence.

    Armed with her transformational leadership degree, she began to explore the balance of emotional, spiritual and social dimensions to help girls reach academic excellence. Providing a supportive and affirming environment for girls outside the classroom could be an important step for their growth and success, she says. With the creation of the Majors Leadership Academy, she’s now developing after-school programs, camps and workshops in leadership development for these girls. She foresees a time when transformational programs will become part of the social curriculum at high schools.

    To advance her vision, she enrolled in the educational leadership doctoral program in SU’s College of Education. Her plan is to continue to pursue transformational leadership, motivated by her desire to support a new generation of dynamic women leaders.

    “I’m very optimistic about what I’m walking into,” Majors says. “It’s the right time and definitely the right place.”

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    Michelle Majors, MATL '11
  • I realize I love the social justice mission of the Jesuits.

    Michelle Majors MATL '11