College of Education Hosts National Film Screening

The school kicks off “Conversation on Education” series with Race to Nowhere
2011-01-05
By Paula Hermann
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 The College of Education is launching a three-part conversation on the state of education by hosting a national screening of the film Race to Nowhere, Tuesday, Jan. 25 in Pigott Auditorium.  

The documentary is a centerpiece for raising awareness of the stresses among young people and for radically changing the national dialogue on education. In the film, a concerned mother-turned-filmmaker aims her camera at the high-stakes, high-pressure culture that has invaded schools and children’s lives, creating unhealthy, disengaged, unprepared and stressed-out youth.   

“This film ignites emotion in educators, administrators, parents and students, so it is an appropriate conversation starter,” said Sue Schmitt, Dean of the College of Education. “There have been multiple national debates about education reform recently, and we are pleased to have the opportunity to lead the conversation in Seattle.”  

The film is the first of three events in the seriesConversation Education: Stimulating the dialogue. Changing the future.The College of Education’s purpose of hosting the 2011 series is to begin a local dialogue on current issues and education reform. The series will include local and national education experts and advocates representing divergent views on reform.  

The College will co-host the movie Waiting for Superman on Wednesday, March 2 at 7 p.m. in the Pigott Building Auditorium with the Seattle University Magis Justice Education Forum. The controversial film, which has elevated national conversations on education reform, will conclude with a reflection hosted by a local panel of education experts. The series will wrap up on Monday, May 9 with a forum featuring nationally renowned educators, policymakers, parents and education advocates—panelists will be announced in January.  

The series is a continuation of the College of Education’s focus on education reform issues that began in last October when it hosted education historian and former assistant secretary of education, Diane Ravitch, in a forum Race to Where?, a conversation centered on the damaging realities of education reform.  

Admission to the film is free, but advanced reservations are required due to limited seating.s Those interested can reserve seats at http://rtnseattleuniversity.eventbrite.com no later than January 21. For more information on the College of Education’s Conversation Education: Stimulating the dialogue. Changing the future., visit www.seattleu.edu/coe/conversation.