School of Theology and Ministry
Admissions

Admissions FAQs

    1. What degree programs does the School offer and where do graduates use their degrees?
    2. How long does it take to complete a Master's program?
    3. How will a Post-Master's certificate help me in my career?
    4. What does the School's student community look like?
    5. Can I take classes without signing up for a specific degree program?
    6. Are there housing options available on the Seattle University campus?
    7. What faith backgrounds do your faculty come from?
    8. What does the School mean when it says it is "ecumenical and interreligious"?
    9. I don't live in the Seattle / Tacoma Metro area. Is there graduate student housing?
    10. Do you have distance learning options?
    11. Is it possible to complete a degree through weekend and summer classes?
    12. Are there learning support services for students who want to improve their study skills?
    13. Are there scholarships or financial aid available?
    14. Does Seattle University participate in the Yellow Ribbon Program for United States Military / Veterans?
    15. What materials are required for admission?
    16. Is it possible to sit-in on a class before applying?
    17. Once accepted, can I defer my start date?
    18. I started a program at another university. Will my credits transfer to the School?
    19. Can I find you on Facebook? 
        

    1. What degree programs does the School offer and where do graduates use their degrees?

    The School offers five Master's Degree Programs. Click the link for each program to learn more about the degree and examples of alumni vocations.

    2. How long does it take to complete a Master's program?

    Two to four years; depending upon the degree program and full-time or part-time status. The average student takes between 6 and 9 credit hours each academic quarter. Check out each individual degree's webpage for the average for that degree.

    3. How will a Post-Master's or Graduate Studies Certificate help me in my career?

    Our certificates are designed to help prepare students with skills that are in demand in a variety of careers. Post-Master's certificates help augment graduate level training in specific fields, and Certificates of Graduate Studies are skill-based for direct vocational application. Learn more about professional certificates.

    4. What does the School's student community look like?

    The School has a thriving student community of over 200 actively enrolled students from a variety of educational and academic backgrounds as well as a diversity of ages. A student community advisory team fosters student community throughout the year through events and deep community discernment. 

    5. Can I take classes without signing up for a specific degree program?

    Yes! We have many options. To audit a course, consider our Continuing Education opportunities. For specific questions you might have, you're welcome to contact Colette Casavant, our Student Community & Admissions Coordinator.

    6. Are there housing options available on the Seattle University campus?

    Yes! There are housing options available at Logan Court, and the Murphy and Douglas Apartments.

    7. What faith backgrounds do your faculty come from?

    Our core and adjunct faculty represent over 13 Christian denominations and nondenominational groups as well as from Jewish and Muslim faith traditions.

    8. What does the School mean when it says it is "ecumenical and interreligious"?

    Seattle University's School of Theology and Ministry was founded with a desire to create a unique learning community that meets the many challenges in our contemporary world, especially the division and polarization that make it almost impossible to build communities promoting human flourishing.

    "Intentionally Ecumenical" – The School has formal agreements and partnerships with 12 Christian denominations and the Unitarian-Universalist tradition. The school's coursework and programming speak across the spectrum of Christianity – from Evangelical to Orthodox – and through the Unitarians beyond. The School's faculty, working each year with more than a 100 advisors from these traditions, has created a dynamic curriculum focused on the values and skills needed to shape today's leaders in congregations, religious organizations, chaplaincy work, social service agencies, industry and government. This curriculum infuses the School's life, from faculty input and encouragement in coursework, to annual lectures, from student leadership opportunities and community engagement to Worship & Liturgy offerings and the School's celebration of the annual annual Week of Prayer. Our commitment to being ecumenical means we have a different type of religious tolerance and cooperation. We speak and hear together where God is leading us.

    "Interreligiously Engaged" – Mirroring the world in which we live, the School of Theology and Ministry is deeply involved with communities from many different religious traditions. Our coursework develops students' ability to appreciate and engage in the challenging but exciting area of interfaith dialogue and cooperative action. With funding by the Henry Luce Foundation, the Alfred and Tillie Shemanski Testamentary Trust, and generous individual supporters, the School is fostering deeper and higher levels of interreligious interaction in a number of ways. Learn more about:

    What does it mean to say the School is "ecumenical and interreligious?" It means your faith perspective and tradition matter in the classroom not only for your own learning, but also for your fellow students. The founding desire of the School continues: We are committed to creating well-rounded ministers and leaders for a more just and humane world. Come and join in!

    9. I don't live in the Seattle/Tacoma Metro area. Is there graduate student housing?

    Yes! There are three housing options available for graduate and law students. The Douglas, Logan Court and Murphy Apartments. Many students also find housing near campus by searching Craigslist or the Seattle U student bulletin boards.

    10. Do you have distance learning opportunities?

    Yes! The School offers several classes that are available with distance technology as well as weekend and summer condensed scheduling. Due to accreditation standards it is not possible to complete a degree with distance technology. For more questions, please contact Colette Casavant, our Student Community & Admissions Coordinator.

    11. Is it possible to complete a degree through weekend and summer classes?

    While it is not possible to complete a degree program by relying entirely upon weedend, summer and evening classes, the School offers a flexible schedule that makes us an attractive option for the working professional. All degree programs include hybrid class options for summer, evening and weekend classes. Internships, practica, spiritual direction, retreats, and independent studies allow commuting students to complete some of their educational expereiences in their own neighborhoods of residence.

    12. Are there learning support services for students who want to improve their study skills?

    Seattle University welcomes and supports a diverse student body and is committed to the academic success of all students. Students are encouraged to visit the Seattle University Learning Center for support with their writing and research requirements. For more information about Seattle University resources for students, visit our webpage on student resources.

    13. Are there scholarships or financial aid available?

    Stafford and Seattle University Loans are financial aid options available to graduate students at Seattle University. Other aid includes Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized Stafford loans, Perkins loans, Seattle University loans, work-study positions, and assistantships. For more information, please see Scholarship Opportunities and Financial Aid. To apply for any of these loans, students must apply through the SU Student Financial Services office and complete a FAFSA online.

    14. Does Seattle University participate in the Yellow Ribbon Program for United States Military / Veterans?

    Yes! Seattle University has signed a contract with the Veterans Administration to provide funding for 80 undergraduate and 30 graduate students through the Yellow Ribbon Program. Funding is awarded on a first come, first served basis. Students are not eligible to receive a Yellow Ribbon Program spot until they are formally admitted to the university. For information about available slots, waiting list options, or any additional questions, please email va@seattleu.edu.

    15. What materials are required for admission?

    Please see the admissions requirements.

    Please send all materials to Seattle University's Graduate Admissions Office, 901 12th Ave., Seattle, WA 98122.

    16. Is it possible to sit in on a class before applying?

    Yes! Contact Colette Casavant, our Student Community & Admissions Coordinator

    17. Once accepted, can I defer my start date?

    Admitted students may defer their acceptance for up to one full year from their initial semester of acceptance. This means that a Fall applicant who defers can enter in the Spring, Summer or Fall of the following year before they would need to re-apply.

    18. I started a program at another university. Will my credits transfer to the School?

    Students may petition to transfer graduate credits earned from another regionally accredited institution or a program accredited by the Association of Theological Schools (ATS). Graduate course credits earned with a letter grade of B or above in academic work comparable to core course requirements at the School may be transferred upon evaluation and approval of the associate dean for academic programs and the registrar. Courses that do not meet core requirement standards may be accepted as electives.Up to 10 credits may be transferred toward the Master of Arts in Pastoral (MAPS) and Master of Arts in Transformational Leadership degree, up to 24 for advanced standing in the Master of Arts in Transforming Spirituality (MATS) degree, and up to 57 credits may be transferred toward the Master of Divinity (MDiv) degree. All non-credit formation requirements and related formation courses must normally be taken at Seattle University for work toward any degree.Students who have completed the MAPS degree from Seattle University may petition the School's admissions committee to accept the earned degree in total or in part toward the MATS or MDiv degrees.

    19. Can I find you on Facebook?

    Yes! And Twitter, YouTube, Vimeo and LinkedIn! See all the links below.